Category Archives: Music

Our Comfort

When in the hour of deepest need
We know not where to look for aid;
When days and nights of anxious thought
No help or counsel yet have brought,

Our comfort then is this alone:
That we may meet before your throne
And cry to you, O faithful God,
For rescue from our sorry lot.

For you have made a promise true
To pardon those who flee to you,
Through him whose name alone is great,
Our Savior and our advocate.

And so we come, O God, today
And all our woes before you lay;
For sorely tried, cast down, we stand,
Perplexed by fears on every hand.

Oh, from our sins hide not your face;
Absolve us through your boundless grace!
Be with us in our anguish still!
Free us at last from every ill!

So we with all our hearts each day
To you our glad thanksgiving pay,
Then walk obedient to your Word,
And now and ever praise you, Lord.

How Sweet the Name of Jesus Sounds

This is one Sacred Harp hymn that is recognizable to many of us who grew up singing traditional hymns in church.  Titled Ortonville in Sacred Harp books, my 1991 edition includes an epigraph referencing Song of Solomon 1:3, “Thy name is as ointment poured forth.”

How sweet the name of Jesus sounds
In a believer’s ear!
It soothes his sorrows, heals his wounds,
And drives away his fears, and drives away his fears.

It makes the wounded spirit whole,
And calms the troubled breast;
’Tis manna to the hungry soul,
And to the weary rest, and to the weary rest.

Dear Name! the rock on which I build,
My shield and hiding place;
My never-failing treasury filled
With boundless stores of grace, with boundless stores of grace.

Text by John Newton, 1779
Tune by Thomas Hastings, 1837

And here it is sung to the tune St. Peter.

Ortonville is the tune I remember best from childhood, but some churches I attended used the St. Peter one.

Come Ye Disconsolate

Come, ye disconsolate, where’er ye languish;
Come to the mercy seat, fervently kneel;
Here bring your wounded hearts, here tell your anguish;
Earth has no sorrow that heaven cannot heal.

Joy of the desolate, light of the straying,
Hope of the penitent, fadeless and pure,
Here speaks the Comforter, tenderly saying,
“Earth has no sorrow that heaven cannot cure.”

Here see the bread of life; see waters flowing
Forth from the throne of God, pure from above;
Come to the feast of love; come, ever knowing
Earth has no sorrow but heaven can remove.

This hymn was written by Thomas Moore (1779-1852), the third verse later altered to the current version by another hymn writer, Thomas Hastings (1784-1872).

From a site dedicated to hymns, Wordwise Hymns:

This is a great hymn of comfort, encouragement for the disconsolate in the face of sorrow and loss….According to the promises of the Scriptures, the Lord is ready to help those who come to Him in faith. And who are the ones who need grace, and mercy, and comfort? Two particular examples are given in the hymn. Those who are sorrowing, who have “wounded hearts” (CH-1); those who have sinned and strayed from the path, and come in a spirit of repentance (CH-2).

For each believer the hymn reassures us, “Earth has no sorrow that heaven cannot heal.” Through Christ, our great High Priest at the Father’s right hand, there is “mercy and…grace to help in time of need,” and we are invited to “come boldly” before the throne and seek it (Heb. 4:14-16). “Boldly.” That does not mean irreverently, or carelessly, but honestly and openly, with cheerful confidence that we’re coming to One who understands and has compassion on us.

For more, including the story behind another song penned by Moore, Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms, go here.

 

 

 

Here is Love

Here is love, vast as the ocean,
Loving-kindness as the flood,
When the Prince of Life, our Ransom,
Shed for us His precious blood.
Who His love will not remember?
Who can cease to sing His praise?
He can never be forgotten,
Throughout heav’n’s eternal days.

On the mount of crucifixion,
Fountains opened deep and wide;
Through the floodgates of God’s mercy
Flowed a vast and gracious tide.
Grace and love, like mighty rivers,
Poured incessant from above,
And heav’n’s peace and perfect justice
Kissed a guilty world in love.

Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis

 

Wikipedia:

Tallis’s original tune is in the Phrygian mode and was one of the nine he contributed to the Psalter of 1567 for the Archbishop of CanterburyMatthew Parker. When Vaughan Williams edited the English Hymnal of 1906, he also included this melody (number 92). Parker’s original words were:

Why fumeth in fight: The Gentils spite,
    In fury raging stout?
Why taketh in hond: The people fond,
    Vayne thinges to bring about?
The kinges arise: The lordes devise,
    In counsayles mett thereto:
Agaynst the Lord: With false accord,
    Against his Christ they go.
  —  Psalm 2:1–2 —  Archbishop Parker’s Psalter (1567)[4]

Part of Vaughan’s composition was featured in the 2003 film, Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World.