Lincoln’s Cooper Union Speech

Lincoln-Cooper-Union-3000-3x2As it was in 1860, our country today is divided on emotionally charged issues.  Lincoln’s thoughtful and carefully researched arguments in this address are followed by an admonishment to his own party,  that we, in 2015,  would do well to follow as another campaign season heats up.
      It is exceedingly desirable that all parts of this great Confederacy shall be at peace, and in harmony, one with another. Let us …. do our part to have it so. Even though much provoked, let us do nothing through passion and ill temper. Even though the … people will not so much as listen to us, let us calmly consider their demands, and yield to them if, in our deliberate view of our duty, we possibly can. Judging by all they say and do, and by the subject and nature of their controversy with us, let us determine, if we can, what will satisfy them….
This next section could have been written today, a description of complete intolerance for opposing views:
      These natural, and apparently adequate means all failing, what will convince them? This, and this only: cease to call slavery wrong, and join them in calling it right. And this must be done thoroughly – done in acts as well as in words. Silence will not be tolerated – we must place ourselves avowedly with them. Senator Douglas’ new sedition law must be enacted and enforced, suppressing all declarations that slavery is wrong, whether made in politics, in presses, in pulpits, or in private. We must arrest and return their fugitive slaves with greedy pleasure. We must pull down our Free State constitutions. The whole atmosphere must be disinfected from all taint of opposition to slavery, before they will cease to believe that all their troubles proceed from us…
I am quite aware they do not state their case precisely in this way. Most of them would probably say to us, “Let us alone, do nothing to us, and say what you please about slavery.” But we do let them alone – have never disturbed them – so that, after all, it is what we say, which dissatisfies them. They will continue to accuse us of doing, until we cease saying.
And his challenging conclusion:
    Neither let us be slandered from our duty by false accusations against us, nor frightened from it by menaces of destruction to the Government nor of dungeons to ourselves. LET US HAVE FAITH THAT RIGHT MAKES MIGHT, AND IN THAT FAITH, LET US, TO THE END, DARE TO DO OUR DUTY AS WE UNDERSTAND IT.
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