Twit and Twitter

After reading someone referred to as a “twit” I decided to clarify the meaning.  Google search suggested I should look at “twitter.” Then I found this definition, which certainly could refer to some twitters as well.
Urban Dictionary: twit
The kind of person that makes a retarded chimp look smart.
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Sleepers Awake!

 

Sleepers, wake! for night swift is flying,
The watchmen on thy walls aloud are crying,
Awake, thou city of Jerusalem!
Hear ye now, ere comes the morning,
The midnight call of solemn warning.
Where are ye, O ye wise virgins, where?
Behold, the Bridegroom comes!
Arise and take your lamps.
Alleluia.
Yourselves prepare, your Lord draws near.
He bids you to His marriage feast.
My choir sang a simpler version of this during Communion today, but this is wonderful.

George Hinke’s Christmas Manger Set

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This is like the nativity set my parents put up every year.  When I was a child it reminded me that Christmas celebrates a real event, mysterious and sacred.  I am putting out mine now.   Today I found the history of this Nativity display on the Glencairn Museum site:

“Christmas Manger Set,” USA, early 1940s. This cardboard tabletop Nativity was published by Concordia Publishing House from illustrations first produced by artist George Hinke. A base is provided with special tabs to hold the 17 lithographed figures upright; each tab is carefully labeled so that even a child can assemble it. Hinke was born in 1883 in Berlin, Germany, where he trained as a painter. He immigrated to the United States in 1923. Hinke specialized in religious subjects and nostalgic scenes of small-town American life. He is best remembered for his illustrations of children’s books such as Joseph’s Story, which tells the Nativity story from Joseph’s point of view, and Jolly Old Santa Claus. Collection of Glencairn Museum.

A Prayer Come to Life

” Beautiful music, beautiful camera work, like a kaleidoscope at times.”  This video is delightful.

Terez Rose  writes about this much loved piece of music:

In the second act of Engelbert Humperdinck’s opera, Hänsel und Gretel, composed in 1892 and first performed on December 23, 1893, there is a treasure that will live forever in the hearts of countless listeners. Called “Abendsegen” in its original German and “Evening Prayer” in English, it’s also known as “The Children’s Prayer.” In the opera, it is what Hansel and Gretel sing before they go to sleep, alone and lost in the woods. The song conjures so many powerful emotions and nuances: the bravery of two scared kids; the comfort of a ritual song or prayer; their faith and hope, and the beauty of all these things (not to mention the stunning music) that arises, like a mystical force, to blanket and protect the two lost children. Humperdinck and his sister, Adelheid Wette, who wrote the libretto, have made it more than “a mystical force.” Fourteen angels take the stage in the opera, in the scene following the children’s song, where they gather round and protect the children, a prayer come to life.

When at night I go to sleep,
Fourteen angels watch do keep,
Two my head are guarding,
Two my feet are guiding;
Two upon my right hand,
Two upon my left hand.
Two who warmly cover
Two who o’er me hover,
Two to whom ’tis given
To guide my steps to heaven.

 

Veni, Emmanuel

My choir’s first Advent Carol, this coming week:

Be not afraid, I bring you good news.
The Savior is coming in glory to you.
He shall be called “God’s Holy One.”
Will you be ready? Will you be ready?
Will you be ready for Him when He comes?
Light the candle, Jesus is coming.
Open your hearts, prepare ye the way.
Sleepers awake, soon is the dawning.
He will turn night into glorious day,
He will turn night into day.
Be of good cheer and put away fear,
The light now is coming to dry ev´ry tear.
Love now with us, God´s perfect Son.
Will you be ready? Will you be ready?
Will you be ready for Him when He comes, When He comes?
Light the candle, Jesus is coming.
Open your hearts, prepare ye the way.
Sleepers awake, for soon is the dawning.
He will turn night into glorious day.
He will turn night into day.
He will turn night into day.
Veni, Emmanuel.
Captivum solve Israel.
Veni, Emmanuel.
Jesus is coming.Jesus is coming.
Could He be coming today?
Light the candle, Jesus is coming.
Open your hearts, prepare ye the way.
Sleepers awake, for soon is the dawning.
He will turn night into glorious day.
He will turn night into day.
He will turn night into day.
Light the candle, Jesus is coming.
Light the candle, Jesus is coming.

Plain Speaking and Lack of Pretense

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From the forward to the 2006 reprinting of President Calvin Coolidge’s autobiography:

When he [Coolidge] assumed the presidency following the 1923 death of President Harding, Calvin Coolidge rapidly won public approval for his integrity, plain speaking and lack of pretense….He became extremely popular, even though he was in style and temperament the antithesis of the conventional view of the “Roaring Twenties.”
    …He repeatedly exhorted the American people to respect public service, to exercise civic responsibility, to value education and character and to reject materialism and prejudice…He was convinced that government, especially the federal government, should first encourage citizens to solve problems at the state and local level.”
My kind of president and man.
And here is Coolidge, commenting on the press and the importance of the President choosing words carefully:
    I have often said that there was no cause for feeling disturbed at being misrepresented in the press.  It would be only when they began to say things detrimental to me which were true that I should feel alarm.
    Perhaps one of the reasons I have been a target for so little abuse is because I have tried to refrain from abusing other people.
    The words of the President have an enormous weight and ought not to be used indiscriminately.
    It would be exceedingly easy to set the country all by the ears and foment hatreds and jealousies, which, by destroying faith and confidence, would help nobody and harm everybody.  The end would be the destruction of all progress.
    While every one knows that evils exist, there is yet sufficient good in the people to supply material for most of the comment that needs to be made.
    The only way I know to drive out evil from the country is by the constructive method of filling it with good.  The country is better off tranquilly considering its blessings and merits, and earnestly striving to secure more of them, than it would be in nursing hostile bitterness about its deficiencies.
Wouldn’t this mindset be helpful today!  And wouldn’t a return to it be a sign of real progress?